Improving Cardiac Care with Remote Patient Monitoring

By 2050, atrial fibrillation will affect over 5.6 million individuals, driving the need for more efficient cardiac care management. 

Many are turning to Remote Patient Monitoring for its ability to improve quality of life for patients, empower practitioners to make the best medical decisions backed by meaningful data, and enable more cost-effective care.

In this webinar, Matt Weisensee, VP of Healthcare Sales at CRF Health, and Brad Shelby, VP of Business Development at AliveCor, discuss the impact that technology has on cardiac care and why forward-thinking healthcare providers are making the switch.

Full Transcript

MODERATOR

Welcome everybody, to today’s webinar. Today’s webinar is Improving Cardiac Care With Remote Patient Monitoring.

I’d like to welcome two presenters to the webinar today. Today we have Matt Weisensee. Matt is the VP of Health Care Sales for CRF Health, and he’s responsible for the continued development and growth of the global organization, including all top-line sales and revenue objectives. Prior to CRF Health, Matt held several senior leadership positions within the security, consulting, biotech, and investigative industries. He also is a graduate of San Diego State University and holds a degree in archeology from the University of London.

Joining Matt today we have Brad Shelby of AliveCor. We’re very excited to have Brad here today. Brad is the Vice President of AliveCor, of Business Development. And prior to joining AliveCor he spent the majority of his career with Medtronic and St. Jude Medical in the cardiac rhythm device management space. Brad is a graduate of the University of Colorado.

So welcome to our presenters.

Today’s agenda is on the screen here, you’ll see that we’re going to review the current cardiology landscape. We’ll talk about the challenges of managing cardiology. We’ll discover how remote patient monitoring better supports cardiology care. Matt will give a personal story about how he used advanced technology for early atrial fibrillation detection. And then we’ll talk about some recommendations for getting started with this technology.

So without further ado I’d like to turn the presentation over to you, Matt.

MATT WEISENSEE

Well thank you, Jackie. Good morning everyone, and good day for all of our guests around the world. Thanks for joining our webinar today. I am very excited to co-present with Brad Shelby. He is a thought leader and a visionary in the cardiac space. He has a very distinguished career in the management of cardiac rhythm devices and solutions. And he now is a very important member of our strategic partnership with the cardiac and remote patient monitoring solution that we offer today, called CareMax from CRF Health.

Before I get started on the presentation, I just want to talk a little bit about the landscape. And I’m going to go through a few simple definitions. What is cardiology? It’s the branch of medicine that cares for diseases and abnormalities of the heart. It’s a combination of different indications in the cardiology disease area. Most prevalent would be heart failure, heart attacks and strokes, and cardiovascular disease. But also, there’s been a lot of attention towards AFib, which I’m going to share a personal story later today, and Brad’s going to elaborate on some of the nuances of these disease states.

BRAD SHELBY

Thanks Matt. I’m really happy to be here. I think it’s conversations like this that are critical to get the needle moving and implement solutions rather than just talking a lot about them. So thanks everybody for joining today. I think this slide is important, it just outlines there’s so many different elements to cardiac conditions. And part of the problem is that people confuse electrical versus plumbing. A heart attack is not sudden cardiac arrest, which is not a stroke. So there’s a lot of confusion as to what exactly people are experiencing. And I think, you know, having the most comprehensive solution and identifying the critical markers to really put the puzzle together is critical to address each of these individually, because they are not one and the same, although they do have a lot of common denominators, but each has unique identifiers that are specific to different disease states. So this slide really illustrates the complexity that we’re dealing with in terms of identifying what exactly is going on with people’s hearts.

MATT WEISENSEE

Thanks Brad. So let’s talk about cardiac diseases by the numbers. Brad, I’m going to turn it over to you.

[04:44]

BRAD SHELBY

Yeah thanks, Matt. I think this is a solution or a problem that is really significant. I think most people really don’t understand that more people die from heart disease and stroke each year than any other disease, more than all forms of cancer combined. So the problem we’re tackling is significant and really impacts everyone’s life. I think Matt’s going to share a personal story, you know my mom passed away suddenly at the age of 69 from a cerebral aneurism, so you know, I know everybody has personal stories, that we’re all affected by this. So it’s really a global problem.

Just some of the numbers. This graphic really illustrates the increasing numbers of the problem. AFib continues to increase and increases every year as our population ages. It is the most common arrhythmia that is experienced in the world. So AFib, we’ll talk a little bit later about people who don’t know they have AFib versus those who have symptoms that are identified. But half a million patients in the US are undiagnosed with AFib, and that’s really scary. Most people, the first time they know they have AFib is when they have a stroke. So early detection and implementing a care plan is critical to avoiding those catastrophic events.

This is just another slide demonstrating the totality of the problem. And this gets more significant as we age, which might be a common theme. But you know, you’ve got a much larger percentage chance of having AFib as you age. But that doesn’t mean that it’s exclusive to older populations. AFib exists in any age population, so when we talk about things like screening, early detection, while certainly there’s additional risk factors that combine to make people more likely to have certain cardiac events, really this affects people of all ages. And it gets worse as we age.

So what do people do when they have symptoms? They go to a hospital, right? And so hospitalizations are really frequent, 750,000 hospitalizations occur annually as a result of AFib. And so, as we might draw the conclusion, the cost is really significant, right. So total annual direct AFib costs are over $8 billion. So the problem we’re tackling again is significant.

This is a really important slide. So when we talk about not only early identifying those with AFib, once we know people have AFib, how can we manage them better remotely. I think frequent fliers to the hospital are not only significant in terms of patient impact, but cost as well. So you know, hospitals are penalized significantly when they have readmissions for certain conditions, AFib being one of them. And this is a really pesky rhythm that’s difficult to control in some instances. So being able to monitor patients remotely and keep them out of the hospital is critical. And then, once they’ve been treated, keeping them back out of the hospital is critical. And again, significantly for cost and for patient experience. So we really need to implement solutions acutely once these patients have been identified so that we can monitor them and better improve their care plans.

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, and there’s a lot of evidence that shows that almost half of all readmissions could have been avoided.

BRAD SHELBY

Oh, thanks for bringing that up, Matt. Yeah, in our conversations with major healthcare institutions around the country, I mean it’s estimated to your point that 30-50% of all hospital readmissions could be avoided with some sort of comprehensive remote patient care program to identify and treat these patients without having to come back to the ER or to the hospital, so that’s a good point.

So we’re going to talk about some of the challenges with managing cardiac conditions. I think this slide really, there’s a lot of stakeholders, but we really need engagement from multiple aspects of the industry. So patients are critical. And patients are more involved in their healthcare than ever before, with the technology that’s now available and the information that’s now available. And they’re thirsty for solutions, so how can we help them, how can we get this information to them. Providers, you know, they’ve been kind of in a gunfight with a knife for a long time. You know, we haven’t empowered them until today’s day and age with the solutions and the technology to enable them to better care for patients. And payers need to come to the table as well and recognize that it’s not about generating revenue, but eliminating cost.

[09:48]

I think when you look at progressive organizations like Kaiser for example, who is their own payer and provider organization, they are really focused on implementing solutions to help drive cost out of the equation. I think when you get to the traditional world, which is really fee-for-service based, there are a lot of challenges associated with implementing solutions that may not be revenue generating, but are clearly cost-avoidance programs. And we’re really caught in a paradigm shift here, and it takes a progressive mindset to understand that certainly while we’re in this evolution, you need to adopt technologies that are going to help better manage patients and drive cost out, rather than focusing on revenue. I think we all know bundle payments are coming, fee for service will be a thing of the past at some point. And—for those sports fans out there—it’s important to kind of skate to where the puck is going to be, rather than wait for that to come to you. So to have a progressive mindset is critical.

MATT WEISENSEE

Good point, Brad.

BRAD SHELBY

So there’s a lot of room to improve, right, I think we all are illustrating the problem. Early identification is key, and I think when we talk about what remote patient monitoring offers, I mean that’s really the crux of it. How can we get out in front of these issues, how can we identify patients as early as possible and implement treatment and solutions that can avoid these major cardiac events, improve patient outcomes, and drive cost out of the equation. So screening, better monitoring solutions. Just anecdotally, I mentioned Kaiser and we’re partnered with them, and they’ve implemented a screening solution in a couple of their primary care locations in patients over 65, so of course, those with a little higher risk factors. And they implemented the Kardia Mobile EKG in their intake process. So when patients come in for a primary care visit for whatever reason, they get their height, weight, blood pressure, SpO2, they now get a 30-second rhythm strip. And in 7000 screens that they’ve conducted to date, they’ve uncovered 3% of patients that were in AFib where it was previously unknown. That’s significant, and that’s really heartening, to think that now these patients can be put on medical therapy and really protected from the severe outcomes that could possibly be lying in wait had they not known about their condition.

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, great point. At the end of the day, this technology can help save money with preventing readmissions, shortening hospital stays, and improving staff efficiencies, as well as improving care and patient satisfaction.

BRAD SHELBY

Yeah, that’s a good point, Matt. I think by keeping these patients out of the hospital for known conditions, it allows—to your point—organizations, everybody has limited resources, no matter how deep your staff is, but being able to focus those resources on acute problems that could be routed and things that could be avoided is critical, and remote patient monitoring is a huge component of that.

MATT WEISENSEE

So remote patient monitoring is a part of telehealth. And telehealth has many different modalities. It’s really the delivery of health-related services through telecom, you know, video conferencing, virtual visits is probably the most known. But there’s also store-and-forward, sending imaging back and forth over the net, and sharing data between different locations. But mobile health is a big part of telehealth today, with the advent of these really easy-to-access technology, mobile phones and tablets with apps that you can download for health and wellness. It’s now being integrated into the overall telehealth industry. But then there’s remote patient monitoring, which really is the core of the actual industry, because it really is the backbone technology that brings all the other parts together.

BRAD SHELBY

I think, you know, telehealth exists—to your point—in many forms and functions. And I think when we look specifically at cardiovascular disease prevention and early detection, you know, you really need to look for the most comprehensive solutions. I think we see a lot of places implementing video conferencing and that sort of thing, but being able to get the specific biometrics and those that are critical to understanding and detecting disease states early, you really need to look for a comprehensive solution. So thanks, Matt.

[14:58]

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, thanks for adding that, Brad.

So according to the Center for Connected Health Policy RPM is the use of digital technologies to collect medical and other forms of health data from individuals and patients from one location and electronically transmit it to another securely to a different location, so that they can make assessments and recommendations for their care. In a nutshell, it’s the collection, transmission, and analysis of vital signs data. And that could be from electrocardiograms in the cardio device to a simple as a scale or a thermometer, or pulmonary types of devices like spirometers and peak flow meters. And of course, the blood sugar glucose meter, which is one of the products that CRF brought to market a decade ago, through Entra Health, which was the first wireless glucose meter on the market.

So I’m going to talk a little bit about applications for remote monitoring. Today we’re talking about the diagnostic monitoring of cardiac events. But it’s also about chronic disease management. And AFib and other types of congestive heart failure and COPD, diabetes, and pulmonary hypertension, asthma are all part of that bucket. And then there are consumer-based apps for self-care and management. It could even include a consumer-based Fitbit or a MyFitnessPal app. But there are also a lot of clinical-grade applications in remote monitoring, including psychiatric and behavioural health—video, visits, consultations, survey tools, as well as programs specifically for reducing readmissions. And I’m sure all of you have plenty of other applications that you can think of.

But Brad, why don’t you elaborate a little bit.

BRAD SHELBY

Yes, I think it’s a good point. So you know, how and where you direct this kind of care is specific to obviously your industry or your business. But really, we see these being the foundation of chronic care management, so managing patients with known conditions, post-cardiac event—again preventing readmissions. And then you know, again, I think it can’t be stated enough, it’s really about early detection, getting patients on the treatment that they need prior to major events, so implementing solutions. And so this is kind of a misnomer too, like should we monitor patients who we otherwise think are healthy? I think yes. I mean, these are the patients that evolve, and it’s really about establishing a baseline, and changes against your baseline. So while you might consider yourself a moderately healthy person today, I think the earlier we empower patients and get markers established so that we can manage changes over time is critical. So really, the market in my estimation is let’s not wait till they’re sick, let’s find them and prevent them from getting sick.

MATT WEISENSEE

Good point. And with the changes in Medicare and Medicaid laws throughout the various states in the country, MACRA laws, value-based care, and now the reimbursable event for preventative care, this makes this a very viable solution.

BRAD SHELBY

And Matt, I just wanted to comment one more time on that. So we see this, a lot of progressive corporations are really getting out in front of this, right. They want to take better care of their employees. Obviously there’s a time-at-work related issue, but also it’s a management program. And they are adopting and absorbing the cost of these, recognizing the overall benefit that it provides for their employees. So you know, there are pockets of really forward-thinking institutions and/or companies, that are addressing this and asking the right questions and implementing solutions to keep their people healthy. So we need to look to those examples and follow the lead on that.

MATT WEISENSEE

Good point. We have customers that use the technology as an employee benefit. They have really progressive health and wellness programs, and they leverage this technology so they can keep their people healthy, engaged, at work, and being productive.

BRAD SHELBY

Exactly.

[20:00]

MATT WEISENSEE

Great. So how does it work?

On the bottom left, you’ll see a series of different types of wireless sensors. Some are wearable, some can even be implanted. We have about 50 sensors integrated into our platform, including the Kardia ECG. We have various means to get the data to the cloud. Wireless through Bluetooth, Wifi, GSM, and even wired and Polymap dongle devices that can connect through a USB port and make disconnected devices connect to the health cloud.

So once the data is in the cloud, it’s shared amongst other systems, including EMRs and EHRs, labs, different third-party applications, hospital systems, practice care management and coordination programs. And then the data flows back out to dashboards for visualization. And that could be in the form of a patient, a physician, a caregiver, or an analyst dashboard, or a third-party app, exchanging data with APIs in the health cloud. And on top of that, there are different applications and solutions and services embedded into these portals, including video consultation, secure messaging, scheduling, as well as surveys. And then, the data flows back to the cloud, and it connects with third-party systems like insurance data and genomics data, as well as physician’s practice data and outcomes data, ultimately all driven by the data that’s acquired, collected, transmitted and analyzed from the patient.

And then the future—and that’s today by the way everyone. There are new technologies, predictive modelling, AI, machine learning, and the integration with social media networks, that create the circle of care and connectedness between the patient, the caregiver the loved one, and the insurance analyst who ultimately pays the bill and assumes the risk.

BRAD SHELBY

Matt, you bring up a lot of great points on this slide, and I think demonstrating the complexity in a simple format of how we get this data to manageable positions and get it to the right people. Obviously in a secure fashion. You know, HIPAA considerations and all that kind of good stuff. But how do we get the right data to the right people at the right time to make informed decisions. So when you talk about predictive modelling and artificial intelligence, this is something that’s near and dear to our hearts here at AliveCor. But as this data gets aggregated, there’s so much fun stuff we can do with it and really identify trends—and again trends against individual baselines, but also population management, population health. You know, getting all this data into the right frame and having it analyzed, the possibilities are endless, it’s really amazing.

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, great. Managing the comorbid indications as well, seeing the data aggregated in one place.

So, Brad, I’m going to turn the presentation over to you.

BRAD SHELBY

Okay. So yeah, supporting better cardiac care with remote patient monitoring. So a couple of slides here.

This is a fun one that I like. We see at AliveCor we’ve revolutionized the ability to get an EKG to determine rate and rhythm status. Clearly the historical approach represented on the left, having patients have to wear something. The compliance rate with these technologies is extremely low, given the poor patient experience. There’s also a social aspect, I mean nobody wants to be at a cocktail party with a big recorder on their hip and wires on their chest. So you know, having the ability to discreetly capture data when necessary is really crucial. And also, it’s a limited time period. So even the wearable options to date, I mean really the most extended is a 30-day patch, and even those that we speak with, the compliance rate of patients wearing the patch for 30 days is extremely low. There was actually a study presented by Dr. Anne Curtis of the University of Buffalo at HRS last year, where she compared the AliveCor cardiac monitor to a Holter monitor in symptomatic event diagnosis. And we greatly outperformed the Holter monitor specifically because of patient compliance.

[24:58]

So we’ve created a better mousetrap, now how do we get that data into the right hands? So this next slide will illustrate. We don’t need to go through all the steps here, but this is kind of traditionally how a patient with palpitations or, you know, just this “I don’t feel right.” So we generally lump that into this palpitations bucket, but what do they go through to typically get diagnosed? Well they go in, they might get an EKG, they might not. They might get prescribed 24-hour Holter, and they have to get that data back and wait for it to be analyzed. Oh, we didn’t find anything there, so let’s try this more extended kind of wearable, and just on and on and on. This process can take months to achieve. And oftentimes you end up with an implantable device, which are extremely valuable in some instances, but also come at a really high cost. So the utilization of those is really being analyzed, not only domestically but across the globe. So they have their place, but we need to find better solutions rather than implanting a very expensive device.

And then you have this slide, we grey out a lot of the stuff, so in fact you can cut out a lot of those. And again, this is cost reduction, right, so unfortunately a lot of those other technologies are reimbursed. But they’re really antiquated, and the diagnostic yield is extremely low. So when you add up all the steps to try to figure out what’s going on with someone, the cost is significant, and you really don’t get an answer most of the time.

This is just a quick slide to demonstrate kind of what we’re doing here at AliveCor. We've got a platform for doctors that we’ve implemented, the HIPAA-compliant cloud-based solution as well. And it’s complementary to what we’re doing with our partnership with CRF and Entra. And if there’s something additional you’d like to learn about this, please email me or reach out and we’d be happy to have a one-off conversation.

And the use cases, we’ve kind of touched on. You know, really it’s about arrhythmia assessment. And this is about 90% of what cardiologists are dealing with, right, it’s like this benign kind of “I feel funny,” the palpitations bucket. Or it’s managing patients with a known condition. You know, AFib can be what’s referred to as paroxysmal, or persistent, or chronic. And really being able to see how the disease evolves over time is critical. So getting different data points over time and comparing them against a baseline is crucial. And I can’t emphasize this enough: diagnosing AFib early in high-risk patients to avoid major cardiac events. And then patient management of cardiac respectors. You know, these are the majority of the buckets that we really see. But again, early detection and diagnosis is critical.

How does remote patient monitoring better support cardiac care? So again, it’s about engaging patients, and we see this as being an increasing trend. And this is growing very rapidly. Patients are taking more control, they’re adopting new technologies. Smartphone utilization is just growing exponentially. I think there’s kind of a stereotype among the industry that older people can’t use smartphones or that they really don’t adopt them. And while I think percentage-wise, yeah, there are fewer 70-year-olds than 20-year-olds, but really there’s more than you think. So we need to give these people tools to work with this powerful technology that can help leverage remote patient monitoring. And then, ultimately what this gives patients is peace of mind. Being able to have response without having to go into acute settings of care, so ERs, doctors offices. Depending on where you live that can be a significant time investment, and the anxiety that those locations create. Remote patient monitoring really delivers a peace of mind to patients, and that’s ultimately what we want is for patients to feel better.

And it’s got to be easy. It has to be easy. The workflow needs to be seamless. Physicians and other caregivers are inundated. I think the average length of patient visit for a cardiologist is something like eight to ten minutes. That’s ridiculous. So by providing more effective ways to manage other patients that don’t need to be seen in office, allows them to spend more time with those patients who have more difficult problems to solve. So really it’s just this cascading flow of benefits, as we address one segment others are addressed, it’s really a domino effect.

[29:55]

MATT WEISENSEE

I couldn’t have said it better, Brad. And that’s a great segue into this next slide. You know, it is all about the ease of use and the accessibility and cost effectiveness of the solution, which your better mousetrap really did achieve. And that’s why we integrated it into the CareMax solution.

On the left you’ll see the device interface in our tablet application that would reside on a patient’s nightstand. It has various biometric sensor gauges that you can click on and drill down. And here you’ll see in the middle, the cardio readout, it’ll show the actual last recorded event. And on the right, simultaneously in real time, this data is transmitted to the cloud, the care point, MyHealthPoint cloud. And it’s then accessible by the physician or the treating caregiver.

And in my case, I actually took a reading with the cardio device, because I came into the office one day, on a Friday in mid-February of preparing for the HIMSS conference. I was actually doing a presentation with Microsoft and Dr. Bob Arnott on the benefits and value of remote patient monitoring ironically, about saving time, money, and lives. So that’s kind of the focus of this example. It’s a real story that was as close to home as possible, it happened to me. So I was in the office and I started feeling fatigued and shortness of breath, I had some palpitations, and I had an elevated pulse rate. So I took my blood pressure using our CareMax kit, and it was elevated. So I sat down, I got a couple breaths of air, and I decided to take out the cardio device from my desk drawer, which now I keep it in my pocket at all times by the way. I was diagnosed with AFib on the tablet. After taking a couple other tests, saying it was unclassified, I immediately was rushed to the ER, and after echocardiograms and two cardiologists and being admitted for a couple days, they gave me a preliminary diagnosis of  pulmonary hypertension with an AFib event that they confirmed because they had this actual recorded event on my tablet, which one of my colleagues from the office handed to the cardiologist on duty. He goes, oh yeah there it is, wow. And it really helped me to understand my condition. It was self-care and self-management. It helped me change my behaviour and my lifestyle. I started eating more healthily, I stopped going to McDonald’s for a Big Mac every other day. I started exercising. And you know, in the end, it was evidence-based clinical decision support that created this diagnosis and the change in my behaviour. And not to mention, it was very cost effective. It was on demand, real time, and it gave me, as Brad mentioned in the previous slide, that assurance and peace of mind. And I’m hoping because I caught it early, I feel young, and I’m mid-age, but my cardiologists at UCSD and at Sharp told me that because I detected it early, I have a 90% greater chance of avoiding stroke. So thanks Brad and the AliveCor team for the innovative approach.

BRAD SHELBY

Well I’m sorry you had to go through that, and I remember you and I texting during that time, that was scary. And I think you’ve pointed out one additional point, which is that if you hadn’t had the ability to record an EKG real time, they might not have known you had AFib, because by the time you get to the ER, these rhythms are transient. And they don’t always last until you get there. Like going to the mechanic, I swear my making that sound yesterday. So I’m glad you’re on the right path, my friend.

MATT WEISENSEE

Thank you. Yeah, great point because many times before, over the last year, I felt the same. And I always chalked it up as indigestion or anxiety, stress, you know. And sure enough, I was diagnosed with a dilated right ventricle. And you know, it was alarming. But I’m glad that I know.

[35:03]

BRAD SHELBY

I’m sorry to interrupt you. Yeah, that really further illustrates the point that we were making earlier about who really should be monitored remotely. And quote-unquote healthy people, we are all horrible patients, and we all ignore a lot of warning signs and chalk it up to exactly what you described. Anxiety, oh it’s a fleeting pain, oh it’s nothing. So you know, having the ability to capture exactly what’s going on real time, is critical.

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, and because the device is so small and easy to use, it does dramatically increase the compliance. You know, the adherence is just exponentially greater than having to go in and get the sticky things. And by the way, when you pull them off your chest, it almost causes cardiac arrest, because it hurts. It’s an uncomfortable position to be in. And as you mentioned, the cardiologist comes in for a few minutes, and all he does is look at the readout. So it’s really great to have that technology at your fingertips literally. And Brad I’ll let you elaborate.

BRAD SHELBY

So I mean I think we’ve really tried to drive home the point that what remote patient monitoring can help you achieve. And I think it’s the cost, the patient experience and ultimately outcomes, saving lives and preventing major cardiac events is critical.

So what can you do? We’re engaged with organizations of all sizes and shapes across the country. I’d like to say hello to my friend on the call, Nathaniel White from Dignity Health. And Dignity is a really progressive organization that is analyzing their current state and addressing what is a critical issue, how do we engage remote patients, how do we provide better care remotely, and ultimately save lives and costs. So hi, Nathaniel, thanks for joining today.

But what are you in fact doing? You know, the first step is taking a quick look, what are you doing, what can you be doing. I mentioned it earlier, skating to where the puck is going to be. The Vice President of Innovation for Baylor Scott & White said, you need to just do something, you need to start, you need to implement, don’t wait for what you would consider to be the perfect solution, because by the time you get there there’s going to be something else. And five years from now is going to be here before you know it. So do something. Start a program.

MATT WEISENSEE

Set your strategy, that’s a great point, Brad. Sorry for interjecting. You know, there’s a recent poll that show that 75% of all healthcare organizations don’t have a digital health strategy. So now is the time to start thinking about it.

BRAD SHELBY

Exactly right.

MATT WEISENSEE

Great. So we’re going to talk a little bit about considerations for assessing a solution or partner in RPM. And I think these are key. It’s not just about the cost. It’s very important, but what about the accuracy and the implementation. How long is it going to take. Is it scalable. Can you integrate it with other systems. Will people use it. Is it easy to use. And does it have security to know that your data is safe. I mean these are all important, and I’m sure there are other ones that Brad can share as well.

BRAD SHELBY

I think you hit the highlights, Matt. I think what we’ve seen is that for those who are already on the path and really want to try to change what they’re doing, what it comes down to is the ease of use and how do we implement it in the workflow. So you know, these forward thinkers, they get it. They’ve swallowed the blue pill, if you will, and they’re going down the rabbit hole. And so they’re engaged and really we need to now then say okay how do we make this as easy as possible to implement within your current workflow and solutions. So that would be my comment on here. The rest of those factors are critical, but we’ve already established that foundation, it’s like how do we implement it, how do we get started.

 

MATT WEISENSEE

 

Great. Thanks a lot, Brad.

 

MODERATOR

 

All right, so now I’d like to jump into the Q&A. And Matt, I’ll leave the floor again with you. Thank you so much for all of your answers, everyone.

 

[Q&A 40:02]

 

MATT WEISENSEE

Thanks. So, first question is:  How do I get started? Well I think we covered that in the last slide about assessing your own digital health strategy. I think, getting buy-in from your stakeholders is key. But I would suggest that you sort by identifying a small cohort, a group of patients, targeting the riskiest or the most costly in your organization. And choose a time period, and actually put this technology to use. You know, I always recommend 25-50 to start, and then escalate it to 100, and then wherever you have the most risk. So great question.

And there’s one on cost. I think, because we have an integrated solution, it all  depends on the size and scope, but we do have different models available per patient per month, managed services. So there’s not a lot of up-front cost associated with it. And in a lot of cases with customers that we have, we’re operating today in 82 countries around the world, we find that our customers are receiving benefits in ROI before even their first invoice appears. So it’s not about the cost, I think it’s more about, how much am I willing to gain. We talk about at-risk models a lot in insurance, but I call it the at-reward model, because the more people that you implement this technology with,  the more money you’re going to save, the more risk you’re going to avoid, and the better your patients are going to feel. And it just makes common sense.

Brad, do you want to tackle the next question, about finding a reception?

BRAD SHELBY

Where is the question, I don’t see it. Oh there it is.

MATT WEISENSEE

Where are you finding reception in the market? First part.

BRAD SHELBY

That’s a great question. And so we again are partnering with organizations across the country, both large and small. We like to point to two of our more significantly known partners, Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic, who are really interested in jumping into the 21st century in terms of how they manage their arrhythmia labs and event monitoring function. It was surprising to see that risk-based trans-telephonic monitoring still exists out there, but it is. And then it’s really, you know, we have partners of all sizes and shapes across the country, almost in every state, from single practice cardiologists to the largest institutions in the world, Cleveland and Mayo. So really, again, it’s people who get it, people who want to make the shift and understand that this is where medicine is headed, and that this is the more effective way to drive cost out of the equation and manage your patients better. And to your point earlier about stakeholders, you really need to get everybody in the room, right. You need your physician champions, you need your administrative champions, your IT champions, your billing. Everybody to be involved and informed, to eliminate as many obstacles as possible, because they will pop up. But adoption is varied, but significant.

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, and then there’s a follow-up about benefits, did we cover those? What about: How long does it take? I’ll share that one with you.

It’s really as simple as identifying the patients. We have a web-based solution jointly, our integrated application. And we deploy devices within days. So it’s as simple as you can imagine.

Brad, do you want to elaborate on that?

BRAD SHELBY

Yeah, I mean I get that question a lot. Like okay, so how do we start. Just say yes. Just agree to the process. I mean, to your point, we’ve got the solution base. We can start today, tomorrow. We often have instances where we agree to work together with an organization and we enrol patients same day. So it’s as fast as you’re willing and/or able to move. So the time is mostly dependent again on getting buy-in from whatever stakeholders are required within that specific organization. That can be as fast as one day and, unfortunately you know, sometimes months, depending on the large organization.

[44:58]

MATT WEISENSEE

Yeah, good point. You know, investments in healthcare technology, they must integrate with a wide array of medical sensors and devices and technology and networks, patient record systems, and more. And for every application that you implement, the solution has to deliver value and exceed the investment. And so we believe that we created that perfect storm of a platform that can capture biometric data across multiple indications, focusing on the riskiest populations, ultimately saving time, money, and lives. And with this new AliveCor Kardia device, it’s really a game changer. And hopefully we can put a dent in the leading cause of death in the world.

Thanks a lot, everyone.

BRAD SHELBY

Thanks, Matt. Thank you very much for allowing me to be a part of this.

MODERATOR

Thank you both so much for this presentation. It looks like there are no more questions at this time. But if anybody thinks of them we do have a follow-up survey following the webinar, so feel free to send any additional questions you may think of after the presentation. As we said, we will be sending a link to the recording following today’s presentation, and I just want to say thank you again to our presenters, Matt and Brad. And thank you everyone for your time today. Have a great rest of your day.

[END AT 46:24]

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